Out of all the clients, friends and family that I have coached, one thing consistently separates those who achieve their fitness goals from those who do not.

That is, the ability to set realistic expectations.

Let me explain.⠀

Person A —-> Wants to lose 20 pounds in time for their end-of-summer vacation.⠀

The problem is, person A has only 30 days until their trip and doesn’t have much more than 20 pounds to lose.⠀

This goal is quite hard to achieve and would require drastic, unrealistic measures.

In addition, person A has no interest in keeping a food log, planning their meals or workouts, or making it to the gym more than twice a week.⠀

These steps are by no means necessary for everybody, but if you are pursuing such a lofty goal, you will have to endure a lot of challenging tasks.


Person B —-> Initially wants to lose 20 pounds for a vacation, but soon realizes that this is unrealistic given their current situation. ⠀

They are self-aware of being able to commit to only to 2 workouts a week, a bit more walking and to eating whole foods more often.

They decide to set a goal of losing 3-5 pounds in 4 weeks, focusing on strength improvements and feeling their best while on vacation.

Person B can make great changes in the 4 week time span while continuing to improve their habits after the vacation is over.

Which person, A or B, do you think will achieve their goals?

Which will enjoy the process more?

Person B of course.

By matching your expectations with what you’re willing to do, things will go much more smoothly.⠀

This isn’t to say that you shouldn’t set big goals; you definitely should if you want to.

But there’s a difference between big goals, and ridiculous or unhealthy ones.⠀

If your goals are huge, you better have a strong why behind them and be ready to work your ass off.

Realistic expectations plus hard and consistent work will produce the results that you seek.


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